Wednesday, 27 May 2015

A Young Man`s Progress, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

                        
                           Destination-Cambridge, The Fitzwilliam Museum
                                  Exhibition-A Young Man`s Progress

This time I`ll take you to Cambridge for a small and interesting exhibition of male`s style.
Hope you don`t mind seeing more of classical art from the University of Cambridge
in my new upcoming posts, when I finally get them edited and ready of course, as
I`m going to pay a visit to Liverpool and North Wales straight from Cambridge,

Displayed to tie in with the exhibition Treasured Possessions from the Renaissance to
the Enlightenment, this series of five photographs is the result of collaboration between
artist-photographer Maisie Broadhead, her sister fashion designer Bella Newell(London),
and historian Ulinka Rublack of Cambridge University.

An impressive display of five modern photographic recreations-printed to large
scale-telling the fictional story of Matthew Smith, a young man from North London,
who is obsessed with clothes. The modern photographs are based upon images
commissioned between 1520 and 1560 by Matthaus Schwartz, one of the most
committed fashion innovators of his time.

 photo IMG_0817_zpsw3yfzrim.jpg
Schwartz was a chief accountant for the super-rich Fuger merchants in sixteenth
century Germany and, from 1520, one of the Europe`s most committed fashion
innovators. For forty years, Schwartz commissioned fashionable, on trend clothes, and
on each occasion, had a small image of himself wearing his new attire.

(Wasn`t he a men`s style blogger of his time?)

In 1560, Schwartz had these images bound into a single volume, now known as
The First Book of Fashion. (available online here) With 137 illustrations, it is the
fullest surviving visual record of  Renaissance male fashions.
 photo IMG_0818_zpsttdqpjen.jpg  photo IMG_0819_zpsxv2ae3qs.jpg

A Young Man`s Progress tells the story of Matthew Smith, a young man from North
London, who, like Schwartz, is obsessed with clothes. Broadhead  and Newell`s  new
Narrative resonates with their own experiences and reflects their particular surroundings.
The photographic compositions and specially created garments relate specifically to
five of Schwartz images, which show him between the age of  17 and 27. Broadhead
finds this stage in Schwartz`s life particularly fascinating, as a search for love leads to
much experimentation.  This expresses itself through a preoccupation with clothes,
which allows for originality, humor, a focus on the self and the desire to be pictured.


 photo IMG_0821_zps9yvmhl1e.jpg
 photo IMG_08181_zps9ffbvhbq.jpg                                                                              * 24 March-6 September
           Courtyard Entrance & staircase, leading to Melllon Gallery (13) landing
              The Fitzwilliam museum, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1RB

                                                         READ ALSO


                                           

                                                Fairytale in a bag

Tuesday, 19 May 2015

L`OCCITANE at RHS Chelsea Flower show

 photo Snap 2015-05-19 at 11.14_zpsec1icso1.jpg
Founded by Olivier Baussan in Haute-Provence in 1976, L'Occitane has always
had strong ties to the authencity of the region, and its close relationship with nature.

           A Parfumer`s garden in Grasse RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2015

Following the success of the gold medal winning L`Occitane garden at the
RHS Chelsea Flower show in 2012 which depicted a sunny Corsican landscape and
fields of Immortelle flowers, L`Occitane is delighted to return to Chelsea once again
in 2015 with a new show garden, this time bringing to life the sights and scents of
Grasse (town of art and history on french Riviera, world`s capital of perfume), with
the help of award winning garden designer, James Basson.

 photo Snap 2015-05-19 at 11.20_zpstdloar9q.jpg
James Basson won awards at RHS Chelsea and Hampton Court shows, as well as
Gold medal and "Flowers and Peace" award at The Gardening World  Cup Modelled
around Basson`s first-hand experiences in Grasse where he has a home. L`Occitane
garden this year brings together the key plant species and breath-taking of Grasse
scents and colours from the rich landscape.

A strong advocate of dry gardens, James is renowned for raising awareness of the
 importance of working with locally-sourced plants and traditional materials, using
no irrigation and keeping maintenance to a minimum. His philosophy is machine-free
(minimal mowing, strimming or hedge cutting) maintenance programme.

 photo designer_zpsgl3qxjgy.jpg                                                                        FIGUIER & OSMANTHUS

 photo figuer_zpsmf7qv10l.jpg
                                                 Available at L'Occitane
Figuier and Osmanthus is an exceptional fragrance capturing the essence of Provencal
summertime by uniting the scent of the sun-warmed fig tree from Provence and the
sparkling osmanthus from the Far East. The fragrance opens with soaring notes of
bergamot and blackcurrant, paired with a ripe, fruity fig. The heart reveals another facet
of the fig through its green leaves, heightened by apricot tinted notes of the Osmanthus
flower.  A warm base rounds off this delicious scent and leaves behind a woody trail of
cedar and musk.

                                         More offers from L`Occitane
Free Next Day Delivery on orders over £45 from Wednesday 20th until Friday 22nd May

                                           What I intend to do now:

* Visit Grasse (surely, without doubt, one day in Spring-Summer and as soon as possible)
* Book tickets for a next year`s Chelsea Flower Show, as a current show is
completely sold out, all we can do now is enjoy photo-galleries at their web-site here



                                             Fairytale in a bag

Thursday, 14 May 2015

Thea Porter, 70s Bohemian Chic. Part 1

              Destination- Fashion and Textile Museum, London, Bermondsey
                          Exhibition- Thea Porter, 70s Bohemian Chic

"Every designer, every artist has to believe that he or she has come up with something
 new, but the truth is that we are all the product of the outside influences, many of them
absorbed unconsciously. There`s a sense in which nothing is new, except in the
rearrangement of images inherited from the past, and passed through the sleeve of
one`s own feelings and sensibility."

Surprisingly, there will be no bright colours or prints, not even a single floaty long
dress in this post, I`ve decided to leave all ethnic hippie and boho-chic for a part 2,
that will be devoted to Kaftans, abayas and eastern influences in 70s.

Lavish black lace, delicate chiffon, sequins and lilies (Thea Porter`s signature pattern)
that`s today`s theme.

 photo IMG_0454_zpsgalufldh.jpg

Launched in April 1976, "Thea Porter France" was a 25 piece collection of high-end,
ready-to-wear garments produced by a manufacturer in Paris. Exploiting Porter`s
trademark antique braids and subtly revealing cuts, the garments were often designed
in a more classical style.

 photo IMG_0456_zps5xybummu.jpg
Thea Porter`s artistic training in Beirut informed her sensibilities for shape colour and
pattern. Unable to find commercially available textiles that were unique and exotic
enough for her fantastical garments, she began to have textiles designed for her
exclusively. Working closely with textile designers, the collaborative process was the
key; she would often made a sketch, or give the designer an illustration or painting
to work from, which would be translated into pattern and then cloth.

These collaborations resulted in original textile designs that boldly integrated the vast
 realm of her influences from lilies (Janet Taylor), Beardsley-esque peacocks
(Sandra Munro), Persian polo players (Sheila Hudson), and abstract hand-painted
waves (Hannah Meckler) to linear paisley prints (Michael Szell).

 photo IMG_0455_zpsk8tzj1oh.jpg

Unable to sew herself, Porter worked closely with a number of outworkers to achieve
her designs. Each worker was an expert in a specific style of garment: Julian Yearwood
cut the Gypsies that were sewn by Meg Lake, while Mrs Pall made a Chazara jackets.
Lake, Pall and seamstress Carla Codara all recall how collaborative Porter was during
the production process.

 photo IMG_0468_zpsyquwzzlg.jpg

"When I design a dress, I try to put it together like a painting: colours, shapes, 
proportions have to work together with a face, which is integral in the whole design"-
                                                                                                       Thea Porter

      photo IMG_0471_zpscwhe6qno.jpg  photo IMG_0472_zpsc8axe3ry.jpg

                                                       In pictures

 photo 2_zpsyauv4ixp.jpg  photo IMG_0479_zpstsmewsqx.jpg  photo 1_zpsursjh3od.jpg
            * Exhibition ran in FTM, 83 Bermondsey Street, SE1 3XF, London
                                       from 6th Fabruary until 3d of May
              For more information on forthcoming events please visit web-site

                                           photo read also exhibition_zpsiguohfcj.jpg


                        

                                         Fairytale in a bag

Monday, 11 May 2015

The Royal College of Art collection for Monsoon

Just before I start talking about new Monsoon`s collaboration, I have to mention my
recent visit to Fashion and Textile Museum in London, Bermondsey that was founded
by British designer Zandra Rhodes. "Thea Porter, 70s Bohemian Chic", that was the
name of an exhibition and I`ll obviously share it with you in my later posts, I enjoyed
it so much that as a result I can`t pass quietly any shop with Middle Eastern, African
or any other ethnic textiles now (including Indian of course).

Well, let`s move straight to the Collection, which was created in collaboration with
the Royal College of Art and skilled artisans in India, celebrates modern and traditional
design.

Every year Monsoon support emerging talent from The Royal College of Art, offering
prize-winning students the opportunity to design a collection. For 2015 they`ve
teamed up womenswear designer Rebecca Stant, and print and textile designer
Lucy Rainbow to create a unique range with artisans across India.

 photo Snap 2015-05-08 at 20.20_zpsdc6vsznj.jpg

"We drew our inspiration from traditional Indian tapestries and clothing from the 
V&A archives, as well as dyeing and printing techniques, to form the silhouette 
of the collection."- Rebecca Stant, womenswear designer

 photo m-rca-feature-new-end-06-full_zpsi6yxf7oe.jpg
"Our time in India was an incredible experience. We worked closely with the artisan 
team to make sure we were happy with every detail and aspect of the design- it was a
long, but rewarding process."-Rebecca Stant, womenswear designer

 photo Snap 2015-05-08 at 20.30_zpsqz8rnthf.jpg  photo Snap 2015-05-08 at 20.35_zpssdhqnopn.jpg

                                                            My picks

 photo 1_zpsa1zj0wwk.jpg
                                                    Dresses at Monsoon                                              

                                            1. Aleris Dip Dye dress- here
                                     2. Pomegranate Woodblock dress- here
                                  3. Lacie Hanky Hem Woodblock dress- here

 photo 2_zpscggpq1r0.jpg
                                             1. Shadow print Jacket- here
                                     2. Ritika Batik Top and trousers- here
                                              3. Ritika Batik Top- here

What do you think of the collection? Are you brave enough to wear bright ethnic prints?

                                        photo read also exhibition_zpsiguohfcj.jpg
               Kensington Palace, "Fashion Rules", runs until Summer 2015

                    

                                       Fairytale in a bag

Tuesday, 5 May 2015

Destination- Tate Modern, London

                                               
                                           Destination- Tate, London
   Interesting facts: It is a former Bankside Power Station, which was  closed in 1981
                                          it`s a family of four art galleries-
                Tate Modern(London, Bankside), Tate Britain (London, Millbank),
                                      Tate Liverpool, Tate St.Ives (Cornwall)
         Installation- Richard Tuttle, I Don`t Know. The Weave of Textile Language
                                             Exhibition- Marlene Dumas

        "For a lot of people art serves as a security-" I know what I like". But it is quiet
               possible to have the other kind of people for whom art is an adventure. 
                     For me art is a kind of food. Food for spirit."- Richard Tuttle

 photo 1_zpsxzp8ha4v.jpg photo 7_zpsy974s9ph.jpg  photo 2_zpsxvy1pips.jpg  photo IMG_0634_zpscfld7u9r.jpg  photo 3_zpsux7axfas.jpg  photo 11_zpslyf5zkuz.jpg
                                         Installation: Richard Tuttle
                         I Don`t Know. The Weave of Textile Language

Since the 1960s, the American artist Richard Tuttle has produced a distinctive body
of work in a range of different media including sculpture, painting, drawing, print
making and artist`s books. His art is often characterised by it`s delicate, poetic qualities,
and the use of simple, everyday materials.

For many years Tuttle has also been a collector and historian of textiles from around
the world. He is fascinated by the process of weaving, as warp and weft combine
 threads into a pattern, and by the different techniques and technologies which ensure
that every culture has it`s own unique approach to making textiles. He has also
considered the links between textiles and language, such as the ways in which grammar
weaves together with  sound and meaning.

 photo 4_zpsxfzjplqm.jpg
Drawing upon these concerns, I Don`t Know. The Weave of Textile Language is project
composed of three parts: a survey of his work at the Whitechapel Gallery (until
14 December 2014) which focuses on his use of fabric and textiles from from 1967 to 2014;
a book conceived in close collaboration with the artist; and a specially commissioned
sculpture in the Turbine Hall in Tate Modern.

This is the largest sculpture Tuttle has ever made, thought the artist stresses that
concern is with scale rather than size. Like all of his work, it represents a determined
engagement with the space that it occupies. The hanging structure incorporates three
fabrics manufactured for the project by textile mills in Surat, India, in each case combining
man-made and natural fibres to achieve the colour and textures specified by the artist.

Richard Tuttle was born in 1941 in New Jersey, He lives and works in the United States.

 photo 9_zps3xbetggp.jpg  photo 10_zpswbxf2kpu.jpg  photo 8_zps45i3yax5.jpg
                           Marlene Dumas: The Image as Burden
                               until 10 May 2015 (5 more days left)

      South African born artist live and works in Amsterdam, the Neverlands.
                                           Period: Contemporary art
 photo 6_zpslx2qieaz.jpg
Marlene Dumas is one of the most prominent painters working today. Her intense,
psychologically charged works explore themes of sexuality, love, death and shame,
often referencing art history, popular culture and current affairs-themes you can explore
through related events.- throught Tatemodern.org.uk

 photo IMG_0656_zpsn89pc8k1.jpg  photo 5_zpsbhaah0ed.jpg
                                          Marlene Dumas website- here

                     photo IMG_0657_zpsnkbvzpwr.jpg

                                                 Fairytale in a bag
                                                      photo read also travel post_zps7cyjr5i0.jpg

                                   

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Wednesday, 27 May 2015

A Young Man`s Progress, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

                        
                           Destination-Cambridge, The Fitzwilliam Museum
                                  Exhibition-A Young Man`s Progress

This time I`ll take you to Cambridge for a small and interesting exhibition of male`s style.
Hope you don`t mind seeing more of classical art from the University of Cambridge
in my new upcoming posts, when I finally get them edited and ready of course, as
I`m going to pay a visit to Liverpool and North Wales straight from Cambridge,

Displayed to tie in with the exhibition Treasured Possessions from the Renaissance to
the Enlightenment, this series of five photographs is the result of collaboration between
artist-photographer Maisie Broadhead, her sister fashion designer Bella Newell(London),
and historian Ulinka Rublack of Cambridge University.

An impressive display of five modern photographic recreations-printed to large
scale-telling the fictional story of Matthew Smith, a young man from North London,
who is obsessed with clothes. The modern photographs are based upon images
commissioned between 1520 and 1560 by Matthaus Schwartz, one of the most
committed fashion innovators of his time.

 photo IMG_0817_zpsw3yfzrim.jpg
Schwartz was a chief accountant for the super-rich Fuger merchants in sixteenth
century Germany and, from 1520, one of the Europe`s most committed fashion
innovators. For forty years, Schwartz commissioned fashionable, on trend clothes, and
on each occasion, had a small image of himself wearing his new attire.

(Wasn`t he a men`s style blogger of his time?)

In 1560, Schwartz had these images bound into a single volume, now known as
The First Book of Fashion. (available online here) With 137 illustrations, it is the
fullest surviving visual record of  Renaissance male fashions.
 photo IMG_0818_zpsttdqpjen.jpg  photo IMG_0819_zpsxv2ae3qs.jpg

A Young Man`s Progress tells the story of Matthew Smith, a young man from North
London, who, like Schwartz, is obsessed with clothes. Broadhead  and Newell`s  new
Narrative resonates with their own experiences and reflects their particular surroundings.
The photographic compositions and specially created garments relate specifically to
five of Schwartz images, which show him between the age of  17 and 27. Broadhead
finds this stage in Schwartz`s life particularly fascinating, as a search for love leads to
much experimentation.  This expresses itself through a preoccupation with clothes,
which allows for originality, humor, a focus on the self and the desire to be pictured.


 photo IMG_0821_zps9yvmhl1e.jpg
 photo IMG_08181_zps9ffbvhbq.jpg                                                                              * 24 March-6 September
           Courtyard Entrance & staircase, leading to Melllon Gallery (13) landing
              The Fitzwilliam museum, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1RB

                                                         READ ALSO


                                           

                                                Fairytale in a bag

Tuesday, 19 May 2015

L`OCCITANE at RHS Chelsea Flower show

 photo Snap 2015-05-19 at 11.14_zpsec1icso1.jpg
Founded by Olivier Baussan in Haute-Provence in 1976, L'Occitane has always
had strong ties to the authencity of the region, and its close relationship with nature.

           A Parfumer`s garden in Grasse RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2015

Following the success of the gold medal winning L`Occitane garden at the
RHS Chelsea Flower show in 2012 which depicted a sunny Corsican landscape and
fields of Immortelle flowers, L`Occitane is delighted to return to Chelsea once again
in 2015 with a new show garden, this time bringing to life the sights and scents of
Grasse (town of art and history on french Riviera, world`s capital of perfume), with
the help of award winning garden designer, James Basson.

 photo Snap 2015-05-19 at 11.20_zpstdloar9q.jpg
James Basson won awards at RHS Chelsea and Hampton Court shows, as well as
Gold medal and "Flowers and Peace" award at The Gardening World  Cup Modelled
around Basson`s first-hand experiences in Grasse where he has a home. L`Occitane
garden this year brings together the key plant species and breath-taking of Grasse
scents and colours from the rich landscape.

A strong advocate of dry gardens, James is renowned for raising awareness of the
 importance of working with locally-sourced plants and traditional materials, using
no irrigation and keeping maintenance to a minimum. His philosophy is machine-free
(minimal mowing, strimming or hedge cutting) maintenance programme.

 photo designer_zpsgl3qxjgy.jpg                                                                        FIGUIER & OSMANTHUS

 photo figuer_zpsmf7qv10l.jpg
                                                 Available at L'Occitane
Figuier and Osmanthus is an exceptional fragrance capturing the essence of Provencal
summertime by uniting the scent of the sun-warmed fig tree from Provence and the
sparkling osmanthus from the Far East. The fragrance opens with soaring notes of
bergamot and blackcurrant, paired with a ripe, fruity fig. The heart reveals another facet
of the fig through its green leaves, heightened by apricot tinted notes of the Osmanthus
flower.  A warm base rounds off this delicious scent and leaves behind a woody trail of
cedar and musk.

                                         More offers from L`Occitane
Free Next Day Delivery on orders over £45 from Wednesday 20th until Friday 22nd May

                                           What I intend to do now:

* Visit Grasse (surely, without doubt, one day in Spring-Summer and as soon as possible)
* Book tickets for a next year`s Chelsea Flower Show, as a current show is
completely sold out, all we can do now is enjoy photo-galleries at their web-site here



                                             Fairytale in a bag

Thursday, 14 May 2015

Thea Porter, 70s Bohemian Chic. Part 1

              Destination- Fashion and Textile Museum, London, Bermondsey
                          Exhibition- Thea Porter, 70s Bohemian Chic

"Every designer, every artist has to believe that he or she has come up with something
 new, but the truth is that we are all the product of the outside influences, many of them
absorbed unconsciously. There`s a sense in which nothing is new, except in the
rearrangement of images inherited from the past, and passed through the sleeve of
one`s own feelings and sensibility."

Surprisingly, there will be no bright colours or prints, not even a single floaty long
dress in this post, I`ve decided to leave all ethnic hippie and boho-chic for a part 2,
that will be devoted to Kaftans, abayas and eastern influences in 70s.

Lavish black lace, delicate chiffon, sequins and lilies (Thea Porter`s signature pattern)
that`s today`s theme.

 photo IMG_0454_zpsgalufldh.jpg

Launched in April 1976, "Thea Porter France" was a 25 piece collection of high-end,
ready-to-wear garments produced by a manufacturer in Paris. Exploiting Porter`s
trademark antique braids and subtly revealing cuts, the garments were often designed
in a more classical style.

 photo IMG_0456_zps5xybummu.jpg
Thea Porter`s artistic training in Beirut informed her sensibilities for shape colour and
pattern. Unable to find commercially available textiles that were unique and exotic
enough for her fantastical garments, she began to have textiles designed for her
exclusively. Working closely with textile designers, the collaborative process was the
key; she would often made a sketch, or give the designer an illustration or painting
to work from, which would be translated into pattern and then cloth.

These collaborations resulted in original textile designs that boldly integrated the vast
 realm of her influences from lilies (Janet Taylor), Beardsley-esque peacocks
(Sandra Munro), Persian polo players (Sheila Hudson), and abstract hand-painted
waves (Hannah Meckler) to linear paisley prints (Michael Szell).

 photo IMG_0455_zpsk8tzj1oh.jpg

Unable to sew herself, Porter worked closely with a number of outworkers to achieve
her designs. Each worker was an expert in a specific style of garment: Julian Yearwood
cut the Gypsies that were sewn by Meg Lake, while Mrs Pall made a Chazara jackets.
Lake, Pall and seamstress Carla Codara all recall how collaborative Porter was during
the production process.

 photo IMG_0468_zpsyquwzzlg.jpg

"When I design a dress, I try to put it together like a painting: colours, shapes, 
proportions have to work together with a face, which is integral in the whole design"-
                                                                                                       Thea Porter

      photo IMG_0471_zpscwhe6qno.jpg  photo IMG_0472_zpsc8axe3ry.jpg

                                                       In pictures

 photo 2_zpsyauv4ixp.jpg  photo IMG_0479_zpstsmewsqx.jpg  photo 1_zpsursjh3od.jpg
            * Exhibition ran in FTM, 83 Bermondsey Street, SE1 3XF, London
                                       from 6th Fabruary until 3d of May
              For more information on forthcoming events please visit web-site

                                           photo read also exhibition_zpsiguohfcj.jpg


                        

                                         Fairytale in a bag

Monday, 11 May 2015

The Royal College of Art collection for Monsoon

Just before I start talking about new Monsoon`s collaboration, I have to mention my
recent visit to Fashion and Textile Museum in London, Bermondsey that was founded
by British designer Zandra Rhodes. "Thea Porter, 70s Bohemian Chic", that was the
name of an exhibition and I`ll obviously share it with you in my later posts, I enjoyed
it so much that as a result I can`t pass quietly any shop with Middle Eastern, African
or any other ethnic textiles now (including Indian of course).

Well, let`s move straight to the Collection, which was created in collaboration with
the Royal College of Art and skilled artisans in India, celebrates modern and traditional
design.

Every year Monsoon support emerging talent from The Royal College of Art, offering
prize-winning students the opportunity to design a collection. For 2015 they`ve
teamed up womenswear designer Rebecca Stant, and print and textile designer
Lucy Rainbow to create a unique range with artisans across India.

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"We drew our inspiration from traditional Indian tapestries and clothing from the 
V&A archives, as well as dyeing and printing techniques, to form the silhouette 
of the collection."- Rebecca Stant, womenswear designer

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"Our time in India was an incredible experience. We worked closely with the artisan 
team to make sure we were happy with every detail and aspect of the design- it was a
long, but rewarding process."-Rebecca Stant, womenswear designer

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                                                            My picks

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                                                    Dresses at Monsoon                                              

                                            1. Aleris Dip Dye dress- here
                                     2. Pomegranate Woodblock dress- here
                                  3. Lacie Hanky Hem Woodblock dress- here

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                                             1. Shadow print Jacket- here
                                     2. Ritika Batik Top and trousers- here
                                              3. Ritika Batik Top- here

What do you think of the collection? Are you brave enough to wear bright ethnic prints?

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               Kensington Palace, "Fashion Rules", runs until Summer 2015

                    

                                       Fairytale in a bag

Tuesday, 5 May 2015

Destination- Tate Modern, London

                                               
                                           Destination- Tate, London
   Interesting facts: It is a former Bankside Power Station, which was  closed in 1981
                                          it`s a family of four art galleries-
                Tate Modern(London, Bankside), Tate Britain (London, Millbank),
                                      Tate Liverpool, Tate St.Ives (Cornwall)
         Installation- Richard Tuttle, I Don`t Know. The Weave of Textile Language
                                             Exhibition- Marlene Dumas

        "For a lot of people art serves as a security-" I know what I like". But it is quiet
               possible to have the other kind of people for whom art is an adventure. 
                     For me art is a kind of food. Food for spirit."- Richard Tuttle

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                                         Installation: Richard Tuttle
                         I Don`t Know. The Weave of Textile Language

Since the 1960s, the American artist Richard Tuttle has produced a distinctive body
of work in a range of different media including sculpture, painting, drawing, print
making and artist`s books. His art is often characterised by it`s delicate, poetic qualities,
and the use of simple, everyday materials.

For many years Tuttle has also been a collector and historian of textiles from around
the world. He is fascinated by the process of weaving, as warp and weft combine
 threads into a pattern, and by the different techniques and technologies which ensure
that every culture has it`s own unique approach to making textiles. He has also
considered the links between textiles and language, such as the ways in which grammar
weaves together with  sound and meaning.

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Drawing upon these concerns, I Don`t Know. The Weave of Textile Language is project
composed of three parts: a survey of his work at the Whitechapel Gallery (until
14 December 2014) which focuses on his use of fabric and textiles from from 1967 to 2014;
a book conceived in close collaboration with the artist; and a specially commissioned
sculpture in the Turbine Hall in Tate Modern.

This is the largest sculpture Tuttle has ever made, thought the artist stresses that
concern is with scale rather than size. Like all of his work, it represents a determined
engagement with the space that it occupies. The hanging structure incorporates three
fabrics manufactured for the project by textile mills in Surat, India, in each case combining
man-made and natural fibres to achieve the colour and textures specified by the artist.

Richard Tuttle was born in 1941 in New Jersey, He lives and works in the United States.

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                           Marlene Dumas: The Image as Burden
                               until 10 May 2015 (5 more days left)

      South African born artist live and works in Amsterdam, the Neverlands.
                                           Period: Contemporary art
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Marlene Dumas is one of the most prominent painters working today. Her intense,
psychologically charged works explore themes of sexuality, love, death and shame,
often referencing art history, popular culture and current affairs-themes you can explore
through related events.- throught Tatemodern.org.uk

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                                          Marlene Dumas website- here

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                                                 Fairytale in a bag
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